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How Raptors Lost Their Primaries by EWilloughby How Raptors Lost Their Primaries by EWilloughby
P. phagia is a terrible thing, and these poor afflicted deinonychosaurs need support and encouragement rather than ridicule.

In increasingly rare instances, P. phagia has been known to mutate to several different genera and species, all of which cause horrible physical deficiencies for the affected animals. Known variations of this terrible, terrible parasite include:

Primaropteryx wristattachia: this variation somehow detaches the primaries from the phalange, leaving them dangling from the wrist.
Remigopteryx phagia: this variation is known to totally consume the arm feathers of a deinonychosaur.
Pronatowrist breakius: This especially dangerous parasite actually deforms the arms by bending the wrists into unnatural positions. Is very painful for the animal.
Jurassopark completefuckupius: Too terrible to describe here.
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:icontyrannosaurusrex-123:
TyrannosaurusRex-123 Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2015  Student General Artist
Jurassopark completefuckupius :dignity-laugh:  Hatsune Miku-04 (Laughs) :dignity-laugh: 
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:iconwhipping-b0y:
WhIppIng-b0y Featured By Owner Nov 4, 2014
:laughing:
Reply
:iconspinozillarex:
SpinozillaRex Featured By Owner Sep 6, 2014
"Jurassopark completefuckupius" OMFG LOL
Reply
:iconmickeyrayrex:
MickeyRayRex Featured By Owner Jul 28, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
im guessing that parasite isnt real and your using it to represent inaccurate arm/wing reconstruction of raptors in plaeoart.........  you sir are brilliant!
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:icontraheripteryx:
Traheripteryx Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Brilliant! XD
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:iconanonymouslifeform:
AnonymousLifeform Featured By Owner May 11, 2014
Ha! Trollmite!
Reply
:icontarbosaurusbatar:
TarbosaurusBatar Featured By Owner Mar 22, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
We lost so much to J. completefuckupius Waaaah! 
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:iconpivotshadow:
PivotShadow Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2014
'Too terrible to describe here.'

I was laughing like an idiot XD
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:iconnettleheart:
Nettleheart Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
*ugly donkey laughter*
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:iconpivotshadow:
PivotShadow Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2014
Pretty much exactly right,yep.
Reply
:iconlittlefiredragon:
LittleFireDragon Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist

The comic made me laugh.

The last line of the description made my day.

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:iconheytomemeimhome:
Heytomemeimhome Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2013
J.completefucupius:effects include symptoms similar to P. breakius and R.phagia on wide scale as well as swollen lips and decompressed and swollen eyes. These mites then proceeded  to modify the vocal organs in a bizarre state of parisitosis this tends to cause dizziness and difficulty breathing and swallowing....I could not bare to see these animals suffer so..
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:iconheytomemeimhome:
Heytomemeimhome Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2013
Jurassopark completefuckupius: forced me to Euthanize my  Deinonychus antirrhopus x Velociraptor Mongoliensis female..... :(
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2013  Professional General Artist
You did what you had to do. It was probably for the best. :(
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:iconheytomemeimhome:
Heytomemeimhome Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2013
IIs there any way to halt It's spread?
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2013  Professional General Artist
There is no known cure, but prevention is a surefire way of combatting the illness! Spread the word and tell your friends how to avoid this terrible disease, and with time we'll stamp it out of existence. 
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:iconivewashere:
IveWasHere Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Ha and then I read a comment saying a T-Rex with feathers is not scary........if they searched up on the bird called "The Great Tit" they would be surprised what this songbird with feathers can do to bats and other birds. :O

Shhhh don't make fun of it's name it might find you! :P

Birds......are dangerous, they don't always just peck your skin, they can eat your brains too if you're not careful. :XD:

I really like this comic, it's showing me an important lesson on the feathers.
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2013  Professional General Artist
Seriously... there are SO many terrifying birds out there. Giant petrels, cassowaries, and golden eagles are amongst the most badass feathered things that are currently living. There's no way that feathers on non-avian dinosaurs would have made them any less scary!

Thanks for the comment. :)
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:iconivewashere:
IveWasHere Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I know right? I love birds because of how unpredictable they can become! :XD:

And you're welcome my friend! You deserve many many many compliments on your art, they are just fabulous and have great details. :love:
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:iconrandomdinos:
randomdinos Featured By Owner Oct 9, 2013
I'll guess Jurassopark completefuckupius is a combination of all described above and also plucks out most of the animal's feathers (if not all of  them) Am I right? :P
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2014
And shrink-wraps them, deformed their skulls, causes huge eye expansions and explosive growth.
Reply
:iconwhiskerfacerumpel:
WhiskerfaceRumpel Featured By Owner Aug 15, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist

Ha, ha, ha!  This is so funny!  Poor deinonychosaur, though. 

 

But I am sad to say, until about last year, at some point in the time I have drawn Dromaeosaurs, they had all experience at least one of each of these terrible feather-mites! 

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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Aug 16, 2013  Professional General Artist
I think most people drew them that way at some point, even the greatest paleoartists. ;)
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:iconwhiskerfacerumpel:
WhiskerfaceRumpel Featured By Owner Aug 17, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
:D 
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:icondinoroy39:
DinoRoy39 Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
lol
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:iconpatrikia-bear:
Patrikia-Bear Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
YEEEEEES.
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:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner Jul 6, 2013  Student General Artist
Well-done.
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:iconjulianraptor:
julianraptor Featured By Owner Feb 26, 2013
i think Jurassopark completefuckupius makes them like the jp raptors poor raptor
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:iconlaughing-dove:
Laughing-Dove Featured By Owner Feb 22, 2013
Are there actual primary feather nubs in the bones of maniraptorian fingers, the way they've found some quill scarring along the forearm?
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:icontomozaurus:
Tomozaurus Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2014  Student General Artist
No animal living or extinct has quill knobs on the hand. Primaries attach to the soft tissue of the finger/s. (I know this reply is almost a year late)
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:iconlaughing-dove:
Laughing-Dove Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2014
No worries about lateness, that is fascinating and good to know. That also explains something that was puzzling me slightly about the way I've seen birds manipulate the primaries. Do you maybe know where I can find more info on this stuff? 
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Feb 23, 2013  Professional General Artist
As far as I know, quill knobs have not been found on dinosaur hands, but every dinosaur we've found with secondary remiges preserved show the same pattern of primary attachment along the second digit of the hand - this goes for oviraptorids, dromaeosaurs, and troodontids. So, positive evidence would have to be found showing a lack of these remiges for it to be considered likely for any species in these groups.
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:icongozer-the-destroyor:
Gozer-The-Destroyor Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2013
I am trying to draw maniraptorians with the proper feathering, but the placement of the primary feathers is confusing. Where are they positioned on the middle finger? How are they attached? I'd love it if someone would make a guide for this.
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:iconmalcolmraptor:
Malcolmraptor Featured By Owner May 9, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Just in case you haven't been answered xD... Primaries are attached to the 2nd finger, and the secondaries are attached to the ulna, like this: [link]. Here's a guide: [link] . Oh, and tertials shouldn't be present in non-avian maniraptorans [link]. ;)
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:iconthebattycrow:
TheBattyCrow Featured By Owner Dec 15, 2012  Hobbyist General Artist
Trolling mites :rofl:
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:iconnekonotaishou:
nekonotaishou Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2012  Student Filmographer
This is the best thing ever! I especially love the binomial names of the parasites :rofl:
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:iconcultistofvertigo:
cultistofvertigo Featured By Owner Aug 23, 2012
For the first panel, I thought there was actually a newly discovered Mesozoic tick or something.

All I've got to say about Jurassopark completefuckupius is that didn't it take a few decades for people to finally stop doing the fucking tail dragging thing? They've known better since the... what, 1920's? And yet you could still find trail-dragging T. rexes in the 1970's? So maybe by 2040 or so that parasite will finally go extinct. :/

It'll be even longer until word finally gets out that Tianyulong really does exist, unfortunately.
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2012  Professional General Artist
I think the biggest thing that will make the JP-style-dinosaur meme start to permanently fade from public consciousness is another Jurassic Park-style cultural phenomenon that incorporates more accurate dinosaurs. I could imagine a huge-scale dinosaur movie with a Pixar budget and a few paleontologist advisors who are actually listened to would do the trick. Of course, whatever new and different accuracy mistakes that movie has will start the cycle anew. The root problem in my eyes is that entertainment and education are rarely married in any substantial (or at least popular) way in our culture.
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:iconnettleheart:
Nettleheart Featured By Owner Jan 1, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Well; we have Walking with Dinosaurs 3D...
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:iconcultistofvertigo:
cultistofvertigo Featured By Owner Mar 9, 2013
That makes so much sense. You're probably exactly right.
Reply
:iconbildbauer:
bildbauer Featured By Owner Jul 31, 2012
Love it! Does anybody know what benefit the Raptors had from their Primary feathers? I mean, these must have been in the way when using the claws. They look like disabling the raptor. Does anyone know about this? Or does anyone have a link to a source where I can read about it? Thanks.
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Aug 25, 2012  Professional General Artist
Sorry for not responding to this comment earlier. There are some specific studies indicating that even rather large primary feathers would not have restricted movements that a dromaeosaur would be using most commonly. Since the wrists allow the hands only to grasp inward, rather than down or outward, feathers along the outside of the digits would not get in the way of this action. This 2006 paper by Senter [link] describes that biomechanical studies on wing motion in dromaeosaurs would not be hampered by long feathers.

A more recent study [link] (Fowler 2011) indicates that deinonychosaurs might have actually benefitted from long feathers on the hands and arms, as these would have enabled the animal to balance while atop a struggling prey animal, much in the way that modern birds of prey use their wings for balance when grappling with prey.
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:iconbildbauer:
bildbauer Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012
Thanks a lot, this is interesting. I would always wonder why recent cassowaries and ostriches lost their primary feathers while theropods did not. These studies bring light to me! Thank you!
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012  Professional General Artist
My mistake, I made an error. It looks as though kiwis do not have primaries - because they don't have a hand for them to attach to, just a tiny vestigial nub of a claw. They do, however, retain fairly complex secondaries, considering the vestigial level of the arms. It appears that in modern birds, the only way to entirely lose the primaries is to lose the hand itself!
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:iconbildbauer:
bildbauer Featured By Owner Aug 29, 2012
I should have known about the ostrich feathers al least.. of course you are right. And Emus have claws, too, I wonder if they still got their primaries (because Emus are sincerely dinosaur-looking to me ;)
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Aug 28, 2012  Professional General Artist
Actually, cassowaries and ostriches have not lost their primary feathers. [link] Even kiwis, whose arms have basically diminished into pure vestigial territory, have remains of primaries. [link]
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:iconforkhead12:
forkhead12 Featured By Owner Jul 15, 2012
See that is what a feathered raptor should look like not those sweater ones or deinonychus with turkey giblets
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:iconakseiya:
akseiya Featured By Owner Jul 4, 2012  Hobbyist Photographer
Oh common, tapping the floor with a scythe-sized talon shifts the saurian from the realm of palaeontology to the realm of Awesome :)
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:iconagathaumas:
Agathaumas Featured By Owner Apr 20, 2012
Damned brilliant! :)
Reply
:iconcrash-the-megaraptor:
Crash-the-Megaraptor Featured By Owner Apr 15, 2012  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
My raptors suffer from another parasite.....Drawfeathera absolutrubbishica, where all the feathers look little more than tufty spikes. XD
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