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March 22, 2014
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The More Accurate Utahraptor by EWilloughby The More Accurate Utahraptor by EWilloughby
Scott Hartman has recently released his silhouette of the new Utahraptor to Phylopic. Even though the paper hasn't actually come out yet, Scott gave me permission to upload my own drawing as well, which he has approved as being accurate (at least from a distance - any more subtle anatomy differences would be likely hidden by feathers). 

Clearly, the new material will completely revamp our perception of what this animal looked like and probably how it behaved as well. Note the downturned jaw with its procumbent teeth and the much shorter limbs and tail. I've heard people say the new material makes Utahraptor "ugly", but I don't see ugly, I just see very, very strange - like an "ostrich bulldog", to use Kirkland's words.

Hopefully we'll see the paper out soon. I don't know much detail beyond what you see here, so I'm as excited as the rest of you. And now to let the ecological speculation on what it was actually doing with that weird jaw and extra-short limbs begin!

This is not technically a new illustration, but a modification of an old one. To compare it to the prevailing paradigm of Utahraptor anatomy as we've known it for many years, see here.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner Edited 1 day ago
So the bear of dromaeosaurs (smaller, faster, more agile Deinonychus and Velociraptor being leopard analogues, and the even more heavily built Balaur being a Smilodon analogue, to judge by modern-day predators. Of course, they probably had much better stamina than these mammals)
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:iconinkybee:
inkybee Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2015  Professional Writer
magnificent!
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Jan 9, 2015
Ugly? It doesn't look that much different from previous reconstructions.
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2015  Professional General Artist
The jaw has a new procumbent shape, and the body proportions are very different: it's quite a bit stouter now, the tail and legs shorter, the neck thicker. 
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:iconlordofstamps:
LordOfstamps Featured By Owner Jan 10, 2015
I know that, but the change in Utahraptor isn't a huge change like say Spinosaurus. I find the complaints to be unwarrented.
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:icon5aurophaganax:
5aurophaganax Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2014
This picture is so awesome!
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:iconlest5000:
lest5000 Featured By Owner Nov 9, 2014   Photographer
cool :)
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:iconkuartus4:
kuartus4 Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2014
When is this new utahraptor paper coming out?
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2014  Professional General Artist
No one is sure... I'm hoping for an early spring release, personally.
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:iconsaurornithoides:
Saurornithoides Featured By Owner Aug 11, 2014
This honestly isn't too surprising, considering its close relative Achillobator's odd proportions
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:iconsasiadragon:
Sasiadragon Featured By Owner Jun 17, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
This thing gets cooler and cooler for every time. I love seeing more realistic dno-art, and I am baffled by how much we can find out about these creatures! That jaw is kind of cool, wonder what it was for.

Oh my, ostrich bulldog. Best description ever.
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:iconweirdness-unlimited:
Weirdness-Unlimited Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I like seeing work of feathered theropods and raptors like this, with legitimately natural looking feathers instead of baby goose down fluff everywhere which in my opinion would be a hindrance and very difficult to groom after feeding. Cool stuff.
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:icontraheripteryx:
Traheripteryx Featured By Owner Jun 11, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Somewhere in the middle, between epicly cool and extreme majestic! :D
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:iconcjcroen:
CJCroen Featured By Owner Jun 9, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
So this is what the new Utahraptor looks like :D
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:icontrisdino:
trisdino Featured By Owner May 30, 2014
The legs do look a bit to drumstick-escue, but other than that, it is a great drawing.
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:icongojira5000:
Gojira5000 Featured By Owner May 25, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
The legs look quite muscular at the top end, sort of like a eagle or phorusrachid. Maybe it used the specialized tarsal claw on it's second pedal digit to inflict puncture wounds on prey by lashing out with the leg and digging the claw into the skin, easing the way into the prey restraint position? I can't see such a robust animal moving at high speeds for long; the big cat comparisons are really becoming very apt now, since Utahraptor seems to be more of a burst ambush-style hunter than a high-speed, long-distance hunter like canids and I could see the arms coming into play in putting the prey animal in the ground. Utahraptor seems to be, to me, at least, the dromaeosaur equivalent to pantherines and the cougar. Which is awesome, but also interesting.

Very interesting.
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:icondjigr:
Djigr Featured By Owner May 3, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
What does "procumbent teeth" mean?
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner May 8, 2014  Professional General Artist
Procumbence in this context means a forward slant - note that the angle of the teeth at the tip of the dentary are closer to the horizontal than the teeth further back in the jaw. The best and most pronounced example of procumbent teeth in a dinosaur is probably Masiakosaurus.
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:iconwynterhawke07:
Wynterhawke07 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
For some reason the links aren't working, at least not for me. :(
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014  Professional General Artist
Sorry about that - Scott has said that he's removed his Utahraptor silhouette from Phylopic to tweak it a bit. I'll remove the link until he puts it back up.
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:iconwynterhawke07:
Wynterhawke07 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
No problem. ^_^
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:iconbracey100:
Bracey100 Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014  Professional Digital Artist
Looks like its traded speed for power as its gotten bigger than its relatives as if its moving toward the body style of the large theropods. Very interesting to see this and I  so glad you could share. 
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:iconpalaeorigamipete:
palaeorigamipete Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
ostrich bulldog seems to be something i would prefer to not cross path with XD
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:iconyutyrannus:
Yutyrannus Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2014
Can I put this on Wikipedia to replace the outdated version of the picture already there?
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2014  Professional General Artist
I've put the new version on Commons, but I'd ask that you please wait until I get some feedback about it before we proceed with putting it into the article.
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:iconwynterhawke07:
Wynterhawke07 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Someone already noticed it and uploaded it. 
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014  Professional General Artist
That would be me! ;)
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:iconwynterhawke07:
Wynterhawke07 Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
Oh. OK, then. ^_^ I was just wondering.
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:iconyutyrannus:
Yutyrannus Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2014
Okay, that's probably a good idea.
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Mar 29, 2014  Professional General Artist
I'm not sure that's a good idea yet, actually - until the paper comes out, it will not be based on anything "published" or cited.
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:iconshinyaquablueribbon:
ShinyAquaBlueRibbon Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2014  Student General Artist
Yaaaay my Utahraptors can stop being oversized Deinonychus now. XD
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:icondinobirdman:
DinoBirdMan Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2014  Student Artist
This is good.
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:iconthedinorocker:
thedinorocker Featured By Owner Mar 27, 2014
What an amazing animal....
it s more heavily built than I thought
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:iconjd-man:
JD-man Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2014
"Scott Hartman has recently released his silhouette of the new Utahraptorreconstruction to Phylopic."

Is there a difference btwn the 2 silhouettes? Just wondering.

"Note the downturned jaw with its procumbent teeth and the much shorter limbs and tail."

It reminds me of a male salmon ( www.fishwatch.gov/seafood_prof… ), which makes me think it's a sexually dimorphic feature. Hopefully, we have enough adult Utahraptor skulls to say for sure 
either way.
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2014  Professional General Artist
There aren't two different silhouettes - seems to be a bug on DA's part of having one tag (italics) inside of another (outgoing link). 

As far as I recall there are multiple Utahraptor skeletons (the famous "family block") waiting to be examined and described, so to whatever extent the unusual new morphology is dimorphic or ontogenic, we're sure to hear about it once the papers come out! 
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:iconjeda45:
Jeda45 Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2014
To me, it looks like Utahraptor has considerably reduced forelimbs--note that they're basically invisible in the new silhouette, and it seems unlikely that they could be folded back. Scott Hartman said that it has a relatively short arm.
If you checked it with him I might just not be giving you enough credit for the revamp and/or overestimating the shortness of the limbs.

It certainly ended up looking cute, though. Who can't love its li'l grin?
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2014  Professional General Artist
Indeed, the forelimb proportion is one part I don't know much about. You may be right, and I'm sure the forthcoming paper and Scott's skeletal (which I have not seen) will clear that up. For now I can chalk up any variation in length of the arms to how much they're covered with and hidden in feathers.
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:iconfranz-josef73:
Franz-Josef73 Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Very nice. I've been looking forward to this. The lower jaw reminds me of some pterosaurs and crocs that nab fish.
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:iconvitor-silva:
Vitor-Silva Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2014  Student
Yeah, finally a -great- hint about the appearence, before the oficial publication! I think that nobody would have suggested these "masiaka-teeth" before seeing it, very weird for a dromaeosaur.
I used to see this odd jaw configuration as being efficient for taking the maximum of flesh from narrow spaces between bones, though now I see that it is generally associated to piscivory. Well, I can't wait to see the conclusions and opinions of the authors.
And, of course, excellent work with the restoration! ^^
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014  Professional General Artist
>I think that nobody would have suggested these "masiaka-teeth" before seeing it, very weird for a dromaeosaur.<

I prefer this Interpretation too, sabertooth cats had also protruding incisors for such a purpose :nod:
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:iconvitor-silva:
Vitor-Silva Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014  Student
I haven't associated the sabertooth cats earlier, this hypothesis makes even more sense to me now!
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:iconhyrotrioskjan:
Hyrotrioskjan Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014  Professional General Artist
It's still just a hypothesis, I will wait for the paper and photos of the fossils before I start speculating again =)
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:iconvitor-silva:
Vitor-Silva Featured By Owner Apr 24, 2014  Student
Idem :)
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:iconewilloughby:
EWilloughby Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2014  Professional General Artist
I wouldn't say it's "generally associated" with piscivory, just that it's consistent with it. But you may also be right that the jaw configuration is a more complex predatory feature.
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:iconvitor-silva:
Vitor-Silva Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2014  Student
True, "generally associated" was exaggeration, Masiakasaurus is the unique example for this interpretation wich I can remember ^^;. But, if piscivory is going to be the case  of Utahraptor, the majority of the restorations will be obsolete not just because the appearence, but for the habits, too (as it is almost always taking down a bigger dinosaurs). Your illustration of the animals at the beach would currently be the closest rendition of a real Utahraptor! Both in the anatomy (still looks bulky and hides the teeth) and behavior :D
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:iconpilsator:
pilsator Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Oh, wow.
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:iconhellraptor:
Hellraptor Featured By Owner Mar 23, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Very robust, if Velociraptor and Deionychus are big cats,this one seems more like a bear whe  comes to its stocky look. And that downturned seems to work almost like a saw of some sort.  I Think that Utahptor was more like wrestler that used more brute force when killing its prey unlike its more elegant relatives.
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:iconacepredator:
acepredator Featured By Owner 1 day ago
I consider dromaeosaurs to be like leopard-wolf-eagle-sabretooth combinations.

They have decent but not insanely fast running speeds, have very good agility, superb stamina, a lot of power for their size, stealth, and possibly pack behaviour.

I imagine they stalked relatively large prey in complex environments, then used agility and gliding for smaller species to outmanoeuvre the prey.
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:iconjeda45:
Jeda45 Featured By Owner Mar 24, 2014
I tend to consider eudromaeosaurians--giant dromaeosaurines in particular--to be basically giant badgerhawks. Even Velociraptor is surprisingly robust, with a proportionally short metatarsus. They all seem to have had a penchant for hunting large prey--we know Saurornitholestes and Velociraptor ate (possibly already dead) azhdarchids, and Deinonychus and Velociraptor clearly fought creatures far larger than themselves (Tenontosaurus and Protoceratops respectively). Utahraptor was the only large predator in its ecosystem and therefore probably the only likely predator of things like Iguanacolossus and Cedarosaurus if they even had any.
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:iconhellraptor:
Hellraptor Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thats a very intresting theory that i agree on. The smaller ones was never the apex predators exept Utahraptor wich shows it was very dangerous and sucsefull predator.
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